Two soldiers walking through a field with smoke coming from the ground.

MISSION

THE MISSION OF AVH IS TO RAISE MONEY TO ASSIST VETERANS WITH HOUSING AND CARE EXPENSES.

Fundraising efforts will focus on individuals and corporations that have evidenced a commitment to veterans’ interests and philanthropy in general. With the help of our supporters, advisors, and directors we can launch significant fundraising efforts in Florida and around the country.

While this is the primary stated goal of the Foundation, we feel there is also a need to focus on Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation, PTSD, Alcohol and Drug Recovery, Interim Hospital Care, and Telemed, as well as other Medical Technologies that can assist veterans.

AVHF UNDERSTANDS THE PROBLEMS AND SHORTCOMINGS AT THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION. WE ARE COMMITTED TO HELPING SOLVE PROBLEMS AND SUCCEED WHERE THE VA FAILS.

22 Veterans commit suicide every day – another 15 die due to VA negligence and nosocomial infection.

WE NEED MORE PTSD AND INTERIM HOSPITAL CARE NOW! THIS IS OUR EXPANDED MISSION.

AVH also seeks government, private capital, and development partners nationally to assist us in developing independent housing and care facilities with delivered medical services. AVH will also be looking at logical urban and rural building conversions that fit our financial and delivery criteria near VA and regional hospitals.

We will also consider sites on military reservations around the country as well as conversion of underperforming hotels and motels.

A group of soldiers standing in front of an airplane.

II. The Case for Helping American’s Veterans

AVHF has drawn heavily from a talented and committed group of professionals with over 30 years of subject expertise.

There are 23 million American Veterans. We are still caring for 500,000 WWII Vets.

A substantial subset of veterans struggles economically. Approximately 1.4 million veterans (6.7%) live in poverty. The unemployment rate for post-9/11 veterans ages 18 to 24 is 30.2%, compared with 16.1% for non - veterans the same age.

THE RESOURCES AVAILABLE ARE INADEQUATE TO THE TASK OF PROVIDING
AFFORDABLE SENIOR – CARE TO VETERANS & FIRST RESPONDERS. WE NEED YOUR HELP.

GIVE AS LITTLE OR AS MUCH AS YOU CAN AFFORD TO ASSIST US IN DELIVERING SOLUTIONS FOR VETERANS ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

AVHF Charter Schools for Nursing
Initial AVHFCS will be in master planned Neighborhood Mixed Med Communities

VETERANS’ HOUSING CHALLENGES

Nearly 4 million veteran households pay more than 30% of income for housing. More than 1.5 million of these households pay more than 50% of income for housing, despite having access to VA loans and other assistance. Vets with severe housing cost burden are more likely to have a disability than other veterans. Among veterans, women are more likely to experience severe cost burden than men.

VETERANS’ SPECIAL NEEDS

26% of post - 9/11 veterans and 14% of all veterans have a service-connected disability. Between 2000 and 2011, more than 233,000 service members had a traumatic brain injury. 25% of veterans age 18 to 25 have a substance use disorder. Permanent housing is the #1 unmet need identified by homeless veterans. Aid and Attendance program is 24000 per yr. with 14000 for costs.

TYPICAL COST OF ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE

When a veteran can no longer live on his own or with others, assisted living is a logical and necessary option. The national median monthly rate for a one-bedroom unit in an assisted living facility is $38,000 per year according to the 2014 Cost of Care Survey released by Genworth Financial Inc. of Richmond, Virginia. The cost has been rising by an average of 4.3% annually over the past five years. The typical assisted living resident has an income of about $19,000. There are a variety of sources for veterans to fund their medical expenses.

MEDICAID

Many vets mistakenly believe that Medicare will cover the cost of assisted living. Medicare isn’t designed to pay for long-term care.

“At the end of the day, your options for paying for long-term care in this country are two: You pay (completely) out of pocket or you pay out of pocket until you get to the point where you impoverish yourself and then go on Medicaid,” says David Kyllo, executive director of the National Center for Assisted Living, or NCAL, in Washington, D.C.

MEDICAID WAIVER

While most states have some funding for assisted living, Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and West Virginia do not have such coverage. Unlike nursing home care, the cost of assisted living is only partially covered under Medicaid, and not all facilities accept Medicaid patients. Some state programs cover only certain types of costs and medical conditions.

The bottom line is that we have approximately 1,500,000 veterans who have difficulty in coming up with the funds for even modest living quarters. This is the worthy group that American Veteran Homes is trying to help.

A white wall with six different military patches on it.